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About Us

Our vision is to be the Institute of Choice for Highway Engineers. Our mission is to provide professional development opportunities, support and leadership for individuals to achieve and maintain professional recognition.

  • Learn about the IHE. IHE membership formally recognises your qualifications and industry experience.

  • We believe we have an outstanding team dedicated to prioritising our members’ interests. If you’re seeking a rewarding and engaging career in a fantastic environment, consider starting your journey with us!

  • We’ve been registering engineers and technicians with the Engineering Council since 1972 and accrediting academic courses since 1989. We’re proud of our long history and provide our members with 50 plus years of highways experience.

IHE Membership

Join us and demonstrate your technical skills, qualifications and expertise to clients and employers. We offer membership types for highways professionals at every stage of their career.

Professional Registration

Becoming a professionally registered engineer demonstrates your high standard of competence and commitment. By choosing to register, you set yourself apart as an engineer with high standards and also demonstrate your commitment to maintain that competence in the future.

Academy Training

The IHE Highway Engineering Academy offers industry-led training in highway engineering. Through one of our specialist training courses leading to an industry-recognised Professional Certificate or Diploma, the HEA delivers the qualifications, skills and knowledge demanded by the highways industry which are in short supply today.

Work with us

Professional Development Partnerships are open to Highways Sector businesses, Local Government Authorities, Academic Institutions, Professional Engineering Institutes and other Highways interest based organisations.

Resources

We administer the registers for Highway Inspectors and Road Safety Auditors as well as manage our active forums contributed to by highways professionals.

James Hornsby IEng FIHE
Traffic Signal Engineer, AtkinsRéalis

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I started in the highways industry in 2013 after completing my A Levels. I joined Atkins as an apprentice in the highways team while studying a BTEC in civil engineering at college. In the first two years of my career, I was able to rotate around multiple teams to develop a range of both technical and personal skills as well as a wider understanding of the highways industry and how the various components come together to successfully deliver projects.

I decided that the traffic signals team was where I wanted to continue my development. This was because it combined a wide variety of disciplines such as design, day-to-day management and maintenance, while also utilising the latest developments in technology. Traffic signals also allowed me to work with a number of local authorities on a secondment basis, which has given me a different perspective on my role as a traffic signal engineer. I have been able to see in more detail how the decisions that I make impact day-to-day lives.

After completing my BTEC, I continued my academic journey by completing an HNC and Degree apprenticeship, both in civil engineering again. As I had focused my career path on the traffic signals industry, carrying on the academic aspect of my studies helped me to further develop a general understanding of the wider industry so that I could then apply it to specific examples within signals. This could range from understanding how surveys are carried out to how projects are managed or how the foundations of a signal pole are designed and built.

Choosing the apprenticeship route has allowed me to gain vital experience in a working environment and the day to-day operations of traffic signals while also gaining my qualifications. This combination also enabled me to become a Fellow of the IHE as well as becoming professionally registered at Engineering Technician (EngTech) and Incorporated Engineer (IEng) levels. The balance of the two elements of the apprenticeship was a key reason for me achieving this and has also set me on the path to working towards Chartered Engineer (CEng) status.

Throughout the early stages of my career, membership and professional registration with the IHE have helped me to define a path for myself while also being able to reflect on what I have done so far. Part of my technical development has been through training courses, such as the traffic control and ITS courses run by the IHE, as well as the numerous webinars that are hosted by the regional branches. The IHE has also helped with the non-technical part of my development. My personal skills have evolved through taking on responsibilities as a member of the IHE Council and IHE Southern Branch Committee as well as being the Early Careers Lead for Intelligent Transport Systems UK. These roles are important to me as I have been able to use my experience of the apprenticeship route into both the highways and the ITS industry to look at how organisations such as the IHE can provide support to early career members as well as students looking at options that could lead to careers.

These roles have given me the confidence to speak on panels at events, network at council meetings and meet people from across the industry when staffing the IHE stand at Traffex. They have also given me the opportunity to write various articles about my experience in the industry. My personal development and confidence have come from maximising the opportunities given to me by the IHE and getting to meet like-minded individuals who also want to help others achieve the most from their careers and give back to an industry, which is a key part of people’s lives – whether they realise it or not.

Matthew Youell MSc BEng(Hons) CEng FIHE
Senior Technical Advisor, National Highways

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Senior Technical Advisor, National Highways

What inspired you to a career in engineering?
My family background was a major factor; my mother was a science and maths teacher, and my father was a lecturer in the physics department at the University of Leeds. I did three separate sciences at 0-levels when the norm was to do an integrated course. This suited me at the time but made me to look at working in areas of applied science as opposed to pure science.

What made you join the IHE?
Having spent most of the 1990s doing interesting things with bridges and other structures, I was given the chance of doing some highway engineering, working on the London primary route re-signing project. This was only supposed to be temporary but by the time we had published the revised Traffic Signs Manual (TSM) Chapter 8 in the noughties it was obvious I was having too much ‘fun’ doing traffic signs and decided to leave IStructE and join the IHE. The Chapter 8 roadshows the IHE did at the time showed a commitment to training in a form that was effective and useful
to practitioners at different levels; also, they were a nice bunch of people!

Has professional registration benefited your career and your employer?
I only became a chartered engineer in 2021; up to a few years ago it was not something which had much bearing on my work. However, with my work through several BSI committees I have to deal with engineers from different areas, including the automotive industry. Whether it was deliberate or not, their response to working with highway practitioners has been coloured by professional qualifications. Given there is a need over the next few years to align highway infrastructure and autonomous systems in vehicles, being a charted engineer will definitely be a help in working with other sectors.

Is there any advice you would give to IHE members?
It is always worth identifying the best learning opportunities or projects where you can have a bit of independence. A long time ago, when on secondment, I was involved with the assessment of the Forth Bridge for Railtrack. Rather than spend many happy hours playing on the bridge along with my colleagues, I volunteered to help, then lead, the development of the structural model used for the analysis. It wasn’t easy, having to do equivalent strain calculations on Christmas Eve while the rest of the office was down the pub, but it was something I could show was my work.

Please describe your role or position within your workplace.
Although I do some project management, I mostly act as a subject matter expert on a range of topics from highway engineering, through traffic signs to temporary traffic management/road works. Given the nature of National Highways, and its various responsibilities on behalf of the transport secretary, there is a dedicated directorate for Safety, Engineering and Standards (SES) led by the chief highways engineer, Mike Wilson. This provides both a direction on standards and innovation but also support and guidance to those building and maintaining roads. While this is mainly for National Highways, on behalf of the Department for Transport we also provide support for the whole UK for Traffic Signs Manual Chapter 8 as well as participation with stakeholders such as IHE.

Can you describe a typical working day?
There is plenty of crystal ball gazing and planning, sketching and drafting out developments for the next five to 10 years. I still have a regular flow of questions and pleas for help, which provide a degree of positive disruption. By finding out what others are having issues with, it hopefully makes it easier to identify gaps in advice, standards and specifications. It’s not a case of identifying things that are wrong; it can be a case of framing or phrasing things better. Being dyslexic does make it less easy to understand why others have different preferences in language; having failed 0-level English three times, I was the benchmark to see if texts made sense!

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
In my current job I can be enthusiastic about engineering. It’s not only spreading knowledge but it’s also trying to create interest in understanding the ‘why’ as well as the ‘what’. With my role I do get to be involved with many innovations; at least before COVID it meant getting out and about looking at the ‘new’ and even testing our products. An early test of in-car technology and autonomous braking systems was particularly interesting, although my manager at the time managed to defeat thesystem and hit the inflatable BMW.

Is there a professional achievement or high profile accomplishment that you would like to tell us about?
One of the current improvements in undertaking road works is a result of nearly 10 years of revising regulations, guidance, and nudging practitioners. Speed limits at major road works on high speed roads were 50mph for many years. Many of the justifications for this were lost in time, but it had been ingrained. We knew from trialling 40mph speed limits that the lower the limit the less effective it was at mitigating risk to road users. As roadworks need to be designed to be safe for  road workers at the permanent speed limit, a significant benefit in both safety and reducing delay could be achieved by designing road works to the highest safe speed. While suitable higher performance signs, markings and equipment have been available, it was only with the opportunity to revise the road works signs in TSRGD 2016 that we could provide flexibility to design works to be safe at higher speeds. Working with fellow IHE traffic sign panel member Andy Sturrock, we tested revised design rules in the simulator at Leeds University. After this it was a case of working with DfT on TSRGD and TSM Chapter 8 to  provide the flexibilities in the design process. Luckily it fitted into the first two priorities of what was Highways England in 2015 (safety and customers) and was adopted by Major Projects, which has been able to roll out the principle of highest safety speed (mostly 60mph), both improving safety and road user experience.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
We have to make road infrastructure more durable using products that are less polluting to manufacture. A by-product of more durable products is that we can reduce risk to both road workers and road users by reducing workers' exposure out on the network. It will need a step change in how we incentivise designers and contractors to choose better products to maintain our roads. Many manufactures have been innovating better products over the last 10 years but many authorities, including National Highways, are working with specifications 10 or 20 years old. I chair the BSI standards committee on the interaction between infrastructure and autonomous in-vehicle systems. While connectivity is important for effective use of the network, the ability of sensors in  autonomous systems to read the road is vital. A universal connectivity system may be a few years away, but we are going to soon get, possibly this year, SAE level 3 vehicles, which should be able to safely navigate along high-speed motorways, dual carriageways and modern single carriageways (depending on the weather). The design of UK roads (and road works) is much more autonomous-friendly than in many European countries. The problem is that we let our roads, from markings to vegetation clearance, deteriorate too much for the systems to work across the network. By the combination of being both green and CAV friendly we can possibly have a step change in  our approach to maintenance.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five years?
The next five years is going to fairly hectic in highways and will define possibly the next 20 in terms of how people are going to use the UK road network (Mobility as a Service anybody?). Hopefully I will have survived this period and will be planning for a transition to retirement.

Do you participate in any other career related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups? 
I sit on the IHE traffic signs panel; we have a varied range of experience and can help with issues which are over and above those covered by the IHE professional certificate and diploma. We like to be asked questions that even we have to think twice about. I also spend quite a bit of time working and sometimes chairing standard committees for BSI. You get to do interesting things and work with colleague across Europe. I also get to spend time reading the Construction Products Regulations and associated documents and try to translate it to be relevant to UK practitioners. I hope its appreciated! 

What would you like to see change about the industry?
I would ban anything that drained the aspiration to do a ‘good’ job rather than do the absolute minimum. While there will be times where doing the minimum is justified, it should be something
which a least causes a pang of regret over the afternoon cup of tea.

Victoria-Anne Walsh BSc (Hons) IEng FIHE RegHME
Highway Systems Manager, Devon County Council

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Highway Systems Manager, Devon County Council

What inspired you towards a career in engineering?
It happened by chance. I took a temporary six-month contract with Devon County Council after college. I wasn’t intending to stay – that was 19 and a half years ago. I instantly enjoyed the work and the challenge of problem solving that an engineering environment offered.

What made you join the IHE?
I have been an IHE member for around five years. I joined after attending the highway maintenance engineering course run by the IHE.

Has professional registration benefited your career and your employer?
Absolutely. I have met several helpful members who have shared their experience with me. The updates provided on changes in the industry have been great and I feel really connected. Devon CC is a very supportive employer. It’s very much a two-way relationship – I try my best to share the skills I have learnt with my colleagues and the council support me in my development as well. A key benefit of being professionally registered is that it gives me the opportunity to mentor others and share my learning with my colleagues. I only achieved IEng two months ago, so I still have lots of learning to do. I am also a chartered manager and found that the access to industry updates and learning tools has been great. I expect IEng to be just as good.

Is there any advice you would give to IHE members?
Do your professional registration: it is a wonderful way to stay connected to the industry and learn from your colleagues nationally. I wish I had done mine years ago. Don’t be put off by the fear of failure. I have been lucky to have the support of a great organisation and wonderful mentors within Devon CC. This is certainly an area for companies to consider.

Please describe your role or position within your workplace.
I work within the council’s traffic and highways maintenance service. I am responsible for the management of business processes and ICT systems, which is necessary to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of our core services to our communities. It is a varied role that I very much enjoy.

Can you describe a typical working day?
I am lucky as I work in a talented and forward-thinking organisation in a role that requires me to interact with various people and teams. These can be internal colleagues or representatives from contracting firms. I’m often working on several projects simultaneously. These are usually business processes or system improvements for highway maintenance works and activities.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?
My role requires an understanding of business efficiencies and performance management as well as needing a deep understanding of the highway maintenance industry. This is a unique blend hat offers a fun challenge.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
I would have to give two answers: the people and seeing improvement projects come to life. I am very much a people person and enjoy a role that allows me to interact daily. An example of where I as able to enjoy both these two aspects would be in 2020 when I had the opportunity to work with talented teams to see a permit for works scheme brought to life.

Is there a great professional achievement or high-profile accomplishment that you would like to tell us about?
I have recently achieved IEng – this was a good achievement that I am proud of. I recently have received some great feedback from the industry on a project I am working on around carbon reduction in highway construction works. There is no greater compliment than positivity from your colleagues.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
Reduction of carbon emissions in highway construction works. Many local authorities have declared climate emergencies – Devon has a net zero pledge by 2030. The hard work is now starting: balancing how to achieve net zero while retaining the great service local authorities offer to maintain a functional and safe road network.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five years?
I hope I will look back and see some of the work that I have contributed to is making a difference.

Do you participate in any other career related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?
I acted as the secretary for SWJAG, SWTMG and SWHAUC for several years ago. I am now working closely with FHRG and SWHA on carbon reduction projects.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/or professionally?
I play the piano and enjoy walking the family dog. As a mother to two young boys, life is never quiet.

Jeevan Birdi Student Member
Coventry University

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As a university student undertaking my final year, I am constantly studying towards my final exams and completing my dissertation. Using the resources the IHE provides me as a student member is helping me in expanding my knowledge to thrive within my studies.

I have completed a year-in-industry placement with Bachy Soletanche working on the pile foundations for HS2 within a design role and I will be starting my graduate scheme with BAM Nuttall upon graduating.

What degree are you enrolled in?
I am enrolled in Civil Engineering at Coventry University.

What pointed you to an engineering career?
Engineering has been something that I have always been interested in, from seeing skyscrapers and highways when I was young. During secondary school, I particularly enjoyed the problem-solving aspects of maths and physics, and this led me to research jobs which are in demand I found Civil Engineering which still interests me very much.

Can you describe a typical day as a student?
This usually entails going to seminars and lectures as well as reading articles and completing coursework at the library.

What made you join the IHE?
I joined the IHE as a Student Member in September 2020 at the start of my university degree. I have now been a member for nearly four years.

Have you considered becoming Professionally Registered?
I would like to become Professionally Registered at EngTech level within the next two years.

Is there any advice you would pass on to anyone considering Professional Registration?
The hardest part is starting, so just begin.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five year’s time?
I will have finished my degree and be working towards becoming chartered.

Do you participate in any other career related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?
I volunteer as Student Council Member on the IHE.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/or professionally?
Outside of work I can frequently be found playing football or watching Coventry City at the Coventry Building Society arena.

Alex Davies BSc(Hons) EngTech MIHE
Technician – Cheshire East Highways / Ringway Jacobs

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What inspired you to start a career in engineering?
I suppose my real interest kicked in when I was about seven years old when we had the house extended. From then on I’ve had a profound interest in knowing how things are built and wanting
to be involved in construction works. It was only after I read up on projects and began my apprenticeship at my former employer that I found I enjoyed the design aspect of projects more.
Midway through studying for my university degree, I heard of vacancies with the local highways business, Ringway Jacobs. I leapt at the opportunity and applied for a technician post in the design
team.

What made you join the IHE?
There were discussions at university about which institutions might best suit my career path. Once I spoke to my line manager at work, I became aware of the IHE and what it had to offer. I joined the IHE as a member initially, and as soon as I was able to I looked into progressing myself to EngTech level.

In what ways has professional registration benefited your career?
It provides me with a path for career advancement and has given me a greater drive to keep pushing for my goals. I am contributing positively to the reputation of my employer within the wider
highways contract as I am able to show that I am committed to upholding professional standards.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?
First of all, get that CPD together. Then, consider what works you have been involved in over the course of your career so far. Make a list and then review the IHE criteria relevant to your level of registration. Break down the work you have done into every item and task you had to do to get to the final outcome. Think of it as similar to taking a car engine apart and laying it all out on the
ground in front of you, piece by piece. Note down every decision and every reason for those decisions. Be thorough, take your time, be clear and concise, but most of all, be confident in yourself and always ask questions if you are unsure.

Describe your role within your workplace.
I was a technician within both the traffic and capital design teams within Cheshire East Highways (CEH). Following a rotation in November 2020, I now currently operate as a technician within the CEH road safety team, which I thoroughly enjoy. The role primarily involves me managing my own projects from initial identification via collision cluster analysis, proposal design stage, right
through to final scheme implementation on site. Additionally, I undertake the preparation of preconstruction information packs. This primarily includes assessing the associated site risks and utility service risks and offering recommendations to overcome these. This is undertaken while I also provide recommendations for the nature of traffic management that should be used when carrying out the works. Other responsibilities include the management of associated scheme finances, and liaising with affected stakeholders and the wider supply chain partners.

Can you describe a typical working day?
I always like to start by going through the ‘To Do list’ and my emails as I find it helps me to organise my day within at least the first half hour of logging on. Then I focus on any urgent tasks that need attending. After that, I tend to get a good rhythm going with my work. The key I have found is setting achievable goals initially, no matter how small.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?
Every job has its challenges. Most recently I have been involved with the Department for Transport Safer Roads Scheme on the A536. This scheme involves various elements of work, including installing average speed cameras along its length. This has proven to be a challenge for me, mainly because I have never been involved in a scheme quite like this in terms of size and the various elements.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
The variety of work and the people I work with. I also enjoy actually seeing the work get delivered as this is a rewarding feeling but also the chance to see how the work is done.

Is there a professional accomplishment that you would like to tell us about?
My biggest achievements are my First Class Honours degree in construction management in 2019 and my EngTech accreditation with the IHE. Both of these have given me confidence at work and in my personal life. As a young kid, I never had much confidence in school to push myself as I was highly doubtful that I would ever achieve a degree, let alone a first, so to be able to attain this was a massive achievement.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
Of course, the most noticeable challenges are the rapid decarbonisation of our industry and the fiscal constraints thrown at us from the pandemic, which has not ended. There is also the added
effect of a mass skill shortage across multiple industries. I believe this is the prime opportunity for us to grow new and fresh talent in the form of apprenticeships. We need to engage more with academic institutions. The mental health of our workforce is also a further challenge that can impact the industry in a wide variety of ways. I believe this will remain a long-standing challenge for years to come following the effects of the pandemic.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?
I’d like to think that I could have achieved my IEng accreditation. Also, I would like to be building on my knowledge in road safety while actively being involved in the auditing process. Within five years I would also like to be an engineer within the road safety ream. However, my focus at the moment is to become an assistant engineer. Long-term, I hope that I can one day become a chartered member of the IHE, and operate as a team leader or manager within CEH.

What do you like about the highways industry and what would you like to see change?
I love the variety of work that you can get involved in, and the challenges that the different workstreams can present. I also like the fact that what we all do in the industry never goes unnoticed,
in the sense that our work is critical. I feel that overall industry communication with the public about our work could improve, as there are quite often misunderstandings that could be dealt with through better communication.

Annabel Carrick BSc(Hons) EngTech MIHE
Transport Planner – Local Transport Projects Ltd

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What inspired you to become an engineer or pointed you towards an engineering career?

Throughout school and college I have always loved geography. I studied BSc(Hons) physical geography at the University of Hull, taking a variety of different modules. Shortly after I graduated in 2018, I was approached by the university’s career department detailing information relating to a transport planner internship at a local company, Local Transport Projects Ltd. Although I was briefly aware of the highway engineering sector, I was not all that familiar with the transport planner role. However, after some research it was clear that it was a career that I could envisage myself in and one that has scope for great progression. I was fortunate enough to be offered the internship, and it led to a permanent role with the company. Three years later I am still learning something new every day and loving my job.

What made you join the IHE?

When I began working for Local Transport Projects, I was instantly made aware of the IHE as other colleagues are members. Also, as one of the company directors, Tony Kirby, is the past president of the IHE, I quickly heard about the benefits of being a member. I subsequently joined at AMIHE level in early 2019. I have since become a MIHE following my successful engineering technician application.

Has professional registration benefited your career and did this have any benefit for your employer?

I am fortunate enough that the company that I work for is heavily involved with the IHE, and therefore I was made aware at an early stage of the benefits of becoming professionally registered. When the opportunity to partake in a professional registration workshop arose, I took the opportunity to find out more about what is involved with the process. Once I was at a stage where I could provide suitable evidence within my application, I got started. It is still early days as I have only recently received confirmation of my successful engineering technician application and associated upgrade from AMIHE to MIHE. That being said, I imagine that it will be beneficial to myself and my employer as my registration shows that I have engineering capabilities that have been recognised by my peers.

Please describe your role within your workplace.

My role as a transport planner includes providing technical input on projects, including traffic engineering and traffic studies, collision investigation, travel plans, highway access appraisals, traffic signal modelling such as network modelling and junction modelling, and highway preliminary design.

Can you describe a typical working day?

My working days vary so much, which is one of the reasons why I love this career. One day I can be working on a travel plan, and the next I can be out on site undertaking a speed survey.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

I wouldn’t say that there are any unusual aspects to my role; however, I do face challenges on a daily basis as I am still fairly new to the industry and coming across new things all the time. I pride myself on asking questions in order to gain as much knowledge as I can in order to continue to develop my skills and understanding of the industry.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?

I love that I am always learning something new and that no two days are the same. The team I have around me are also fantastic and so supportive.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?

Just do it. Although the application process may seem daunting at first, it really is worth it in the long run. The feeling of accomplishment and pride you get when you are notified of your professional registration success is great.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?

Sustainability – I believe that more infrastructure for green vehicles (ie electric vehicle charging points) needs to be implemented in order to see a major shift towards these modes of travel.
At the moment I don’t think enough convenient infrastructure is in place, resulting in people using alternative vehicles, such as petrol or diesel cars, which are detrimental to the environment.

What are your future ambitions?

In five years time I would like to have further developed my skills and have become a senior transport planner. I would also love to have gained Incorporated Engineer professional registration.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?

I have recently been approached by the IHE to participate in creating a student paper competition for 2022/2023 using the topical theme of sustainability, which I am very much looking forward to.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/ or professionally?

In my spare time I enjoy going to concerts and supporting my local rugby team. I also enjoy exploring new places, particularly ones that are warm and sunny!

Professor Alan Woodside OBE MPhil CEng FICE FIEI FCIHT FIAT FIHE
Retired

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Prof Woodside OBE MPhil CEng FICE FIEI FCIHT FIAT FIHE is officially ‘retired’, but currently a visiting professorial fellow in civil engineering at Aston University as well as a private engineering consultant

What inspired you to become an engineer?
I enjoyed technical drawing, mathematics, construction and sciences.

What made you join the IHE?
I wanted to contribute to the development of safer, more durable and more economic highways. I have only been a member of the IHE for three years.

What contributed to your decision to become professionally registered?
I believe that all academic staff teaching highway engineering in universities or colleges should be professionally qualified.

Has professional registration benefited your career and your employer?
As an academic and researcher for 40 years I believe I have been able to teach, guide and direct young lives. I have supervised 58 PhD graduates from across the world. As a member of the Joint Board of Moderators I am able to assess other universities and thus assist my own establishment. I have also endeavoured to link my research and teaching to my consultancy.

Is there any advice you would give to other members?
Continue to learn something new every day. Constantly ask yourself: ‘Is there a more efficient way to do that task?’ When it comes to professional registration, do not hesitate, set your sights on expanding your knowledge and never stop your education.

Please describe your role within your workplace
I act as a consultant throughout the world, endeavouring to solve highway engineering problems, with more than 500 consultancies.

Can you describe a typical working day?
Checking examination papers for a university; assessing an application for IEng or CEng, drafting an application for a research grant for a client; preparing for a court case; preparing a lecture for a short course; analysing results from a series of laboratory tests.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?
Doing something for £1 that anyone could do for £5.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
W B Yeats said: ‘Education is not the filling of a pail but the lighting of a fire.’ My enjoyment is seeing fires being lit.

Is there a personal professional achievement that stands out in your career?
In the 2012 New Year Honours list, the Queen awarded me the OBE for ‘services to highway engineering and higher education’.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the industry?
The biggest challenge facing the highway industry will be the finite resources of petroleum/ bitumen – less than 30 years left worldwide.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five years?
My ambition within the IHE is to increase membership, resurrect the Northern Ireland branch and establish an MSc in highway engineering to embrace all of the IHE CPD courses.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?
I am a STEM Ambassador (Ambassador of the year 2018). I review for the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation, the Institution of Engineers Ireland, the Institute of Asphalt Technology, and the IHE. As a member of the assessment panel of the Joint Board of Moderators I help assess all university degree courses. I also act as a mentor.

Outside work, what do you enjoy doing in your spare time?
I am a governor of a nursery school, a primary school, a grammar school and a regional college and serve on three university industrial advisory boards. I am vice chairman of the board of governors for a school in Cyprus. I am also visiting professor in highway engineering at the Technical University of Malaysia. I organised and instigated an award for primary school children (throughout Ireland) who have shown ‘encouragement to others’

Katherine Moynihan ICTTech MIHE
Transport Planner, Jacobs

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Transport Planner - Jacobs

What inspired you to become an engineer?
It was by complete chance that I discovered this position – I was working as a waitress at a local hotel where Jacobs was having a Christmas party, and after some research into what they did I decided it sounded like an opportunity for me! Before graduating with my town planning degree, I undertook a summer placement with the Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering Team at  Jacobs in Shrewsbury, which I very much enjoyed.

Why did you choose highways and is there anything you would change about the industry?
The highway industry provides a fast-paced environment that offers a variety of challenges and opportunities to develop my career. There is a variety of career opportunities within the industry. I would like to see more diversity in senior positions and more opportunities to learn directly from senior management.

What made you join the IHE?
I joined the IHE as an Affiliate Member in 2018. I found it best reflected my professional interests, and with most of my team being members of the IHE and active members of the Merica Branch (West Midlands), it felt like a natural progression.

Has professional registration benefited your career and your employer?
Registration has allowed me to meet highways professionals from a variety of different companies and make new friends. I was also able to attend the IHE Merica Branch 2019 Awards in  Birmingham, which was a fun evening, and myself and a colleague won a highly commended Safety and Innovation Project of the Year Safety Week 2018. Professional registration also broadens the type of work I am eligible to undertake and has increased my confidence to approach new tasks. It provides me with resources to work towards my goal of chartership.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?
Make sure you maintain logs of all your CPD activity and particularly interesting or challenging projects you have worked on. This will allow you to save a lot of time when it comes to finalising your submission.

Please describe your role.
I’m a transport planner in Jacobs’ Shrewsbury office. My role involves using a variety of modelling software and currently I’m focusing on development control work for Worcestershire County Council. I enjoy the variety my role provides and the people I work with day to day are great.

Can you describe a typical working day?
A typical working day starts with a morning briefing call. This provides a great opportunity to continue catching up virtually with my team, where pre-COVID-19 I would have been sat next to them. For the last 18 months, I have been working on a local authority framework contract. My role requires me to respond to all major planning applications, acting as the highway authority. This involves reviewing all planning documents, modelling and associated drawings (site  plans, visibility splays, vehicle tracking), and attending client and developer meetings. I then provide my comments acting as the local authority client. I really enjoy working alongside the local authority, and the different transport professionals in my team at Jacobs and beyond.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your work?
Transport planning is a broad discipline that requires a variety of skills and involves staying up to date with policy, technical standards, software and different scales of modelling. This ensures
the job never gets boring.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
I most enjoy the opportunity to work on a variety of different projects in different regions. My team are particularly great people so that’s also a bonus.

Is there a great professional achievement or high-profile accomplishment that you would like to tell us about?
I gained ICTTech professional registration in July. I was the first person in my company to achieve ICTTech with the IHE, which I am very proud of. I currently sit on the inaugural Junior Leadership Team at Jacobs, representing my team. This has allowed me to directly interact with senior management and provides a unique opportunity to both learn from them and reverse mentor them.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
As a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Ambassador I believe that one of the main challenges facing our industry is ensuring our industry makes STEM more appealing to young students. I particularly believe this is critical for females, as less than 13% of the current STEM workforce in the UK is female. Likewise, with around 55% of the world’s population living in
cities, it is crucial to rethink how cities look and work. Jacobs is well placed to be at the forefront of this, adapting to new markets as clients face new challenges. However, with the increasing focus on digital solutions the challenge of maintaining cyber security is critical. One of the greatest challenges facing the industry right now is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. With shifting work
patterns, restricted data collection on site and decreased face-to-face contact, it is critical to respond in innovative and pragmatic ways.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five years or what are your future ambitions?
Within the next five years I hope to have completed my IEng and have been promoted to a senior transport planner.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?
I’m a STEM Ambassador, Positive Mental Health Champion at work, and sit on the Junior Leadership Team within my business unit in Jacobs. In addition to this, I have assisted graduates with completingtheir Graduate Development Programme at Jacobs.

Is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time?
I enjoy any opportunity to be outdoors and exploring new places. I’m a keen traveller and hope to resume my international travels once restrictions allow. I am an animal lover as well. I spend a lot of my time walking my friend’s golden retriever, Chester, who I think is the best dog in the world.

Naomi Lawrence EngTech MIHE
Assistant Engineer, Cheshire East Highways

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What inspired you to become an engineer?
I started in the highway industry as a permit technician. Once I gained an understanding of what the different areas were within Ringway Jacobs I gained an interest in learning more around
civil engineering and design. As it was something new, and a challenge, I became very passionate about becoming an engineer and progressing my knowledge and experience. I wanted to prove to myself and my peers that I could do this.

What made you join the IHE?
I joined the IHE at apprentice level while I was completing my ONC Level 3 in Civil Engineering. My tutor suggested this to me while I was on my course as it was the most suitable professional Institute for the work I do. I have been a member for over three years and I am also EngTech registered for over two years.

Has professional registration benefited your career and your employer?
Yes as I have more opportunities for progression within the company I work for. Being registered has helped me get the position in the company I am now. Registration has helped me access more information, CPD events and training courses. It has helped me increase my knowledge within the workplace and improved my confidence.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?
Don’t hesitate, just do it. Take the chance and leap. I didn’t realise I was ready to achieve this until it was suggested to me; within four months I had achieved my EngTech. Research it, go through the information provided, refer to schemes/projects that you have already completed, find your areas and gaps that are missing and work on them where possible. I am lucky I have a mentor at Ringway Jacobs who pushes me to keep progressing.

Please describe your role or position within your workplace.
I am an assistant engineer for the Design Team with Cheshire East Highways (Ringway Jacobs). I started this role in January. The role involves providing technical support for design schemes for Cheshire East Council. I design schemes with the use of AutoCAD and associated software such as Keylines and Keysigns, to produce detailed drawings issued to contractors to complete the works required. I also ensure the requirements under construction, design and management (CDM) for each scheme are produced for the site works. This includes assessing traffic management requirements and collating the statutory undertakers’ service plans, such as United Utilities, telecommunications and electricity, which are present in the area. My role includes legal processing of traffic regulation orders (TRO) to ensure all the relevant documents are approved before the installation of restrictions are implemented. This includes parking restrictions, school keep clear markings, parking bays and speed limits. I ensure the relevant documents are advertised accordingly and that the legal orders are sealed to make sure schemes remain on programme for construction.

Can you describe a typical working day?
I log on, check emails, then go through a to do list so I meet deadlines for my tasks. A lot of my work is related to legal processes as I deal with TRO schemes, so I make sure all documents are correct and designs are completed to specifications and standards. I ensure the programmed works are on schedule to be completed by the correct date, and support engineers in the team with any tasks required such as statutory undertaker plans, pre-construction information/health and safety. I also respond to residents’ enquires or any objections to TRO schemes when they have been advertised.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
Problem solving and working on AutoCAD, drafting designs for schemes that are being installed. Being able to see the work on the ground once done is enjoyable.

Is there a great professional achievement that you would like to tell us about?
Before I started working for Cheshire East Council, I joined the Prince’s Trust as I had confidence issues. This helped me to secure an apprenticeship (originally in business admin) which led to
securing a permanent position within the council after 18 months. I won the Young Achiever of the Year for the North West 2013 award for how much I had progressed from 2010 to 2013, which gave me the confidence to keep progressing. I was nominated by my tutor for Apprentice of the Year in Civil Engineering and the Built Environment while I was finishing my Level 3 ONC. This was for both South and West Cheshire College and I won in March 2018 (I was the only woman in this category).

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
Reduced budgets but with more works required; also reducing CO2 emissions.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?
I would like to progress to engineer level in the next five years, or around that timeframe but I am also currently working towards IENG registration, which I will hopefully achieve in the next two years.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities or membership of other engineering groups?
I am now part of the North West Branch IHE Committee Meeting.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time?
I like to play online games such as World of Warcraft and Minecraft. I also exercise at the gym four times a week. This really helps me to unwind after a busy day at work and promotes my positive mental health. I also used to be part of a drama group but due to COVID-19 it is currently on hold.

What else might you have done for a living if you didn’t enter highways?
I would of still being working in business administration as that is where my career started when I was 18 years old. I chose the highways industry as I wanted to have a new challenge and learn something new. I had outgrown the job I was doing and was ready to take the next step to try to progress my career in a different area.

What do you like about the industry and what would you like to see change?
There is a lot of variation within the industry, a lot of different companies that you can learn from and progress within. A change in communication is key for the industry to grow and improve, sharing of information knowledge and experience.

Jackie Davies CEng FIHE MSc BSc
Principal UTMC Engineer at Bristol City Council

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Principal UTMC Engineer at Bristol City Council

What inspired you to become an engineer?
Nothing! I pretty much fell into the work area by accident; luckily I found I really enjoyed it.

What made you join the IHE?
I joined in 2017 as a member, with the intention of applying for chartership.

What contributed to your decision to become registered professionally?
I wanted my expertise to be recognised and to develop further. The application process assisted me to achieve this as I measured my performance against the Engineering Council’s metrics. I used this process to identify and address weaknesses in my engineering ability and obtain accreditation at the end.

Has registration benefited your career and did this have any benefit for your employer?
I believe that it’s been beneficial for both myself and the council. I am able to demonstrate that my engineering ability has been assessed and approved by my peers. My employer is able to show they have chartered engineers within the team, which is beneficial to the council’s reputation. My employer assisted me during the application process.

Describe your role or position within your workplace
I run the traffic control service for Bristol City Council, including both the UTC/ SCOOT® system and the intelligent transport systems. I manage the network and its systems to  maximise efficiency, dealing with equipment faults and completing or overseeing projects that improve the network.

Can you describe a typical working day?
There isn’t a typical day. I have to balance a range of conflicting projects and activities, while managing live incidents, and equipment or software faults as needed. I frequently intend to work on one thing, but end up doing something else. As a result, I have a very agile approach to delivering priorities and am guaranteed lots of variety as I work to keep Bristol moving by solving whatever problem is trying to ruin our day. It’s a juggling act, but always interesting and challenging.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
The variety in the work, the challenge, and applying my problem-solving skills to deliver something that makes a difference to people. As the principal technical expert for the council, I regularly have to work out problems that I’ve never encountered before. Investigating these issues and developing solutions to them is enjoyable.

Do you have a professional achievement or high-profile accomplishment you could tell us about?
Over the last few years I’ve been approached by other engineers and asked where they can obtain SCOOT® training and support. Aside from supplier training and consultancy support, there’s not
much practical skills training available to help new starters within highway authorities to become skilled in UTC/ SCOOT®. As a result, I’ve spent the lockdown period producing an online, selflearn training course with the support of JCT Consultancy that will hopefully address this training gap. I’m hoping this will benefit other highway authority staff with their personal development and traffic signals work.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
The pandemic is likely to place further pressure on local government finances at a time when we face an unprecedented environmental situation. If funding drops, the maintenance of our assets will become more challenging, which will have a negative impact on our ability to manage them and their corresponding environmental impact. This and the skills shortage are the biggest challenges I can see.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities?
I am passionate about sharing knowledge, especially around helping local authorities to develop in-house UTC/SCOOT® expertise and to better understand how to design signals to work well with SCOOT®.  In addition to the UTC/SCOOT® course I developed with JCT, I also worked with both JCT and the IHE to deliver a ‘SCOOT® for Traffic Signals Design’ section into their respective  advanced traffic signal design courses. I occasionally provide consultancy support to highway authorities via Integrated Traffic Services LTD.

What do you like about the industry and what would you like to see change?
I like that it’s a small industry where it’s easy to make contact with other professional to get advice or share knowledge. I value events like the JCT Symposium and Traffex, as they support networking and knowledge sharing. The small nature of the industry does carry the risk of skills being lost as people retire or leave.

Chris Bowley IEng FIHE
Self-employed – senior partner CB+Associates

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What inspired you to become an engineer?
Being technically minded and achieving an A level in Engineering Drawing, I joined the City of Chichester as a draughtsman and it grew from there.

What made you join the IHE?
I was a member of the Highways and Traffic Technicians Association, which eventually morphed into the Institute for Highway Incorporated Engineers. I was elected as a Fellow in January 1973 and awarded IEng in April 1989. And then the IHIE became the IHE.

Has professional registration benefited your career and did this have any benefit for your employer?
Definitely! I have had a long career in both the public and private sectors but promotion in the latter was always more easily achieved by having registration.

Is there any advice you would give to members?
If you want to increase your professional standing, seek to become registered.

Please describe your role or position within your workplace
Currently, a self-employed consultant running my own small part-time business.

Can you describe a typical working day?
Mainly working from home on a demand basis. I do both paid and voluntary work. It is varied and interesting.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
Being able to give back to the industry my time and experience for the benefit of new and younger members.

Is there a professional achievement you would like to tell us about?
There are many for me, but notably being associated with the strategic network in the UK. I was the author of the first successful TMC contract for the (holistic) M25 maintenance. I was also the project manager for the transition of the Hindhead Tunnel from build into operation.

Given the current economic and environmental climate, what do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
To meet and satisfy both government and public aspirations.

What are your plans for the future?
To continue working for as long as I am able, putting my time and experience to good use.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?
I am a mentor and professional reviewer for the IHE and have served for many years on its Council. I am currently the champion and auditor for CPD. I am an active branch committee member on the Southern Branch. I am a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers and the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/or professionally?
I am currently the chairman of the residents association at the estate where I live and enjoy helping members with their problems.

What do you like about the industry and what would you like to see change?
Being able to drive on the local highways that I have maintained for many years. I would like to see these given better recognition as they are always perceived as a poor relation.

What do you do in your spare time?
Travel and visit as many National Trust properties as I can with my wife, Wynne.

Ellie Gormley IEng FIHE
Self Employed – Freelance Engineering Consultant

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What inspired you to become an engineer?
As a young girl I was always making things with Lego or Meccano so I guess it was just destiny. My first job was a trainee draughtsperson, but I was far more interested in the design element.

What made you join the IHE?
I joined the IHE in 1997. I had no professional qualifications at that time, but was ambitious to have post nominals. I also had the desire to volunteer to help others achieve their professional goals.

What contributed to your decision to become professionally registered?
I was ambitious and wanted to progress my career and prove to myself I could do it. The salary enhancement when I was professionally qualified was also important, as it afforded me the lifestyle I wanted.

Has professional registration benefited your career and did this have any benefit for your employer?
Yes. It presented opportunities to network and share in new ideas and sustainable innovations to enhance the projects I was involved in. It has opened up lots of opportunities for me and provided
a fantastic avenue to network and observe new ideas and innovations. In addition to my STEM ambassador role, the IHE has given me the opportunity to be involved in mentoring, assessing and reviewing members to achieve their professional goals.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?
Don’t hesitate, just do it.

Is there any advice you would like members to take into consideration?
Absolutely, encourage all your work colleagues to consider getting professionally qualified. There is a wealth of information on the IHE website to assist you to in becoming professionally qualified,
and many CPD opportunities to share good practice. The Engineering Council is now becoming much more strict on checking individuals’ CPD records and the IHE can fill any gaps you may have. As an institute, we are one of the bodies that have a direct input in accrediting university degrees, and student members should make sure the qualification they are studying is accredited. The IHE can advise you on this.

Please describe your role or position within your workplace.
Before finishing full-time work, almost three years ago, I was principal engineer in the highway design team at Telford & Wrekin Council. I deputised for the engineering manager as required and was responsible for project managing larger schemes from the Highways Capital Programme.

Can you describe a typical working day?
There was no such thing as a typical day. I may have been out on a construction site, checking that the quality of work , or chasing up actions for projects or ensuring that everyone who needs to now the progress of a project has been informed. I also would check designs or write design briefs back in the office. My current role, as a freelance consultant, is different, I am networking with both consultants and contractors, negotiating contracts and project managing.

Are there any challenges or unusual aspects to your role?
You sometimes get faced with issues and think, how on earth do I deal with this? In the early years of my career, while I was being supported educationally, it was difficult to progress and get promotion. As a woman engineer I felt that my skills were not being recognised. I had to move authorities in order to climb the career ladder. I have however seen a marked difference over the past few years and believe that women are being far more recognised in the industry.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
The variety of the work, the networking openings, and most importantly the opportunity to make a difference to the local road network.

Is there a great professional achievement or high-profile accomplishment that you would like to tell us about?
I co-ordinated and delivered one of the first Safer Routes to School Projects in Staffordshire. It was a community-based project and not without its challenges, but the sense of pride I had when
everyone worked together to achieve their goals was totally satisfying. I really enjoyed the community aspect.

Personal accomplishment?
Being asked to be a future President of the IHE. I will be honoured to undertake the role and will promote the institute and to the best of my ability.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
As the highway network is in constant need of upkeep and traditional remediation, there are many environmental challenges we are faced with. For one, we need to ensure the road network is constructed or repaired in a more sustainable way. Many companies are now looking at ways to recycle materials for road construction; however this doesn’t come without cost so there is a balance to be had. Another challenge is public perception; we need to raise the public’s awareness so they can improve their own carbon footprints. Economically, we have a real shortage of skills in the highways sector, which will be extremely damaging in the future if not addressed soon.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five years’ time or what are your future ambitions?
In five years time, I will have the honour of being the President of the IHE. Our team of staff and volunteers do an incredible job, and I am looking to build on that to further promote the Institute
and provide members with the tools they need to achieve their professional goal.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?
Yes. I am a mentor, reviewer and assessor for the IHE. I have been a previous chair of the IHE Mercia Branch and as a keen golfer I organise the IHE Mercia Branch annual golf day. I am the IHE’s epresentative on the Joint Board of Moderators, and, periodically, a member of the team which undertakes university visits to assess engineering degrees for professional accreditation. I am a member of the Industrial Liaison Board at Aston University, a STEM ambassador, and have just received my 100 hrs Certificate. I am also a member of the Women’s Engineering Society
(WES).

Simon White MEng CEng FIHE
Divisional Director - Highways - Dyer & Butler

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What inspired you to become an engineer or pointed you towards an engineering career?

As a child of the eighties I was a Lego fanatic – never following the instructions but creating all sorts of structures, definitely a few bridges. I remember being amazed driving through the major motorway widening projects of the time, wondering at the sheer scale of human endeavour. All of this was capped off with a great two week experience designing parts for oil rigs. It was civil engineering all the way from the age of 14.

What made you join the IHE?

I am a very new member of the IHE. While I have been in the highways sector for over 20 years, I hadn’t aligned to a professional body within the sector itself. At Dyer & Butler we are encouraging our people, whatever their background, role, or career route, to consider professional development and this must start at the top. Having worked closely with current President Stephen Webb and
CEO Steve Spender in my career, it was their encouragement to explore the IHE that ultimately led me joining.

Has your professional registration benefited you and your employer?

Yes, very much so. Professional registration brings many benefits because it is industry-wide recognition of so many important attributes – professionalism, expertise, experience, values and integrity. Becoming a chartered engineer has certainly provided me with a great foundation for my career and facilitated progression. Most importantly, it has helped prepare me for the challenges and opportunities of each new role and more recently to progress to becoming a Fellow of both IHE and ICE. Similarly, for my employer Dyer & Butler, professionalism is a vital part of what we are about. Truly professional expertise is vital when delivering complex projects directly for our clients such as Highways England, Network Rail and Heathrow Airport.

What makes an organisation ‘professional’?

Well, the competence and professionalism of its people. Our success is entwined in this and that’s why we encourage and support all our engineers to pursue professional registration and continue to develop and learn. The IHE has run a ‘lunch and learn’ session for Dyer & Butler’s highways division, which has encouraged a good number of colleagues to start or restart their professional development.We are also working with IHE to deliver training modules in asphalt and traffic management to improve knowledge.

Is there any advice you would like members to take into consideration?

Actively consider and find out all you can about professional registration. Speak to those who have gone through the process. I know how daunting it can sometimes seem if you have to undertake additional study or development on top of a busy day job. But I can assure everyone it is so rewarding in so many ways to develop new skills, gain new knowledge and give yourself the best possible footing for career progression.

Please describe your role or position within your workplace.

I am divisional director for Dyer & Butler’s highways division. I am responsible for leading more than 150 people who deliver highway improvement works for local authorities – mainly through 16
long-term frameworks – and for Highways England. My role entails all elements of business management including safety, financial, commercial, operations and business development. As part of the Dyer & Butler executive team I also have a role leading the wider business. I really enjoy sponsoring some of our internal best practice groups including our project management forum and our workforce engagement meetings.

Can you describe a typical working day?

It’s varied and that is why I like the job so much. I can be engaging with our frontline project teams, talking to senior clients about solving their complex challenges and working in our executive team to make our business even better – all on the same day.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

In addition to our core highways business, I am also responsible for delivering key framework contracts in our ports and power sectors, which share similar delivery skillsets. While the core scope of works is quite similar to highways, the wider approach in these sectors differs. I really enjoy the opportunity this presents for cross-sector learning.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?

It’s the old cliché but it’s true – it’s the people who make our industry so great. I am a people person and thrive on meeting terrific people who are all passionate about the importance of highways.

Tell us about one of your high profile accomplishments?

There are a few that stand out, but I think it has to be back in 2014 when I was at the frontline of the major flooding event in Somerset – supporting the county council with the immediate emergency response, the subsequent clearup and then rapid delivery of major projects to reduce further flooding and mitigate its impacts. It is some of the best collaboration I have seen in the industry. Adversity generates the best in all of us, and the COVID pandemic is no exception.

What do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?

In the short-term, the greatest challenge is continuing to navigate our way through the global pandemic. In many ways, the continued spend in our sector has protected us better than some. However, it has been a challenging time for so many of our colleagues. A real concern is the lasting impact from the mental health toll the pandemic has created. At Dyer & Butler we have increased our number of trained mental health ambassadors, including each member of the executive team. We have one of our ambassadors on call at any time of the day or night in a business that operates around the clock.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?

An important part of my remit is about how we can shape and bring together the capability and value offering that exists within our wider operating businesses across M Group Services; not just within the highway sector, but also our water, energy and telecom sectors. I look forward to seeing how we can develop our capability to build and maintain the digital road of the future. So, in five years, I see myself still engaged in the highway sector but also sharing some of our industry’s best practice with other sectors and vice versa.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities such as mentoring or volunteering?

I have recently been appointed chair of the new Highway Maintenance Group for the Civil Engineering Contractors Association. The group has been established to represent companies delivering maintenance works in the sector – a key need since the Highways Term Maintenance Association closed last year. We are focusing on five themes that members see as industry priorities – health, safety and wellbeing, carbon neutrality, collaborative procurement, longer-term pipeline visibility and productivity. In these early stages, I am liaising closely with other industry bodies to ensure we are not duplicating effort but collaboratively supporting wider industry initiatives and change.

What do you do in your spare time?

Aside from being an avid kayaker, I have a real passion for travel and experiencing new places and cultures. I also have a love for iconic bridges and my family are very patient with me as we tick off the next structure during holidays. I have had the pleasure of crossing some of the greatest – from the Golden Gate to Sydney Harbour to Brooklyn. However, nothing compares to Brunel’s Suspension Bridge in my home city of Bristol!

Gary Neill IEng FIHE
Area Road Engineer, Falkirk Council

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Gary is Area Road Engineer for Falkirk Council

What inspired you to become an engineer or pointed you towards an engineering career?
I always enjoyed maths at school and problem solving. Prior to training to be an engineer I was at college doing architecture (shhh!). However, I was lucky enough to apply for a trainee scheme with Falkirk Council in civil engineering where I would learn at college and on the job.

What made you join the IHE?
I joined as a student member around 10 years ago when I began to look to professional registration through the Engineering Council. The best institute for me was the IHE as its most relevant to my line of work.

Can you describe a typical working day?
A typical day usually starts with getting woken up by a screaming toddler around 5am, then off the gym and settled down to my office desk (now at home) around 8.30/8.45. After that it is hard to define, even more so now. However, it usually involves checking in with staff and supporting them with the various ongoing projects. It also includes a host of tasks such as ensuring capital and revenue budgets are managed; ensuring performance targets are met; attendance at meetings; ensuring health and safety requirements are met; ensuring the department adheres to legislation and dealing with industrial and human resource management (not all at once). I love being busy, and I’m currently undertaking a Business Management degree at Strathclyde University.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?
Obviously, COVID has presented challenges to how our services are delivered on behalf of our constituents. Working from home, for example, presents practical challenges for managers.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?
Working in the public sector. It is very satisfying making a difference to the communities we serve. I take great pride in seeing our projects through to completion and the positive impact that it
makes. I really enjoy solving problems and delivering solutions, especially on the drainage side of our job. I also really enjoy the fastpaced nature of the role.

Is there a great professional achievement or high-profile accomplishment that you would like to tell us about?
At university, I (our team) won a prize in the structural design competition and our design represented the university at the national competition. I also recently became the chair of the Scottish Branch Committee of the IHE.

What contributed to your decision to become professionally registered?
To me, it was the next logical progression in my career and my goals – as is working towards CEng now. The support and mentorship from colleagues through the process was also a factor.

In what ways has registration benefited your career?
It has made me a more confident practitioner and given me more credibility as an engineer.

How does your employer benefit from your professional registration?
My employer really does invest in upskilling its people and by mentoring me and others they get better engineers, as well as proving the competency of their staff.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?
It’s not as daunting as you may think. Just start! The reward is worth it.

Given the current economic and environmental climate, what do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?
The biggest challenge we face in the industry and the country as a whole is the dynamic situation that is COVID-19 and its impact, how its managed, and how our assets are actually used or possibly repurposed to meet users’ needs.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?
I am currently in the process of compiling my CEng application and I’d like to think that in five years I will have attained this. Studying business management will be very useful for my career aspirations as well I hope, and will complement my engineering degree.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?
I am the chair of the Scottish Branch of the IHE and regularly provide technical events for our members. I am on the national Council too and active within the professional development portfolio group, which is responsible for the professional certificates and diplomas the institute offers. I am also a reviewer at IEng level for the institute.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/ or professionally?
I am a keen musician and have played in bands since my teens. I also love watching football.

Andrew Bell MIHE
Assistant Highways Engineer, Jacobs

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Assistant Highways Engineer, Jacobs

What inspired you to become an engineer or pointed you towards an engineering career?

From a young age I enjoyed helping my dad with DIY projects. I was interested in the design of objects and how they progress from conception to the finished product. This interest and passion as the driving force to becoming a civil engineer.

What made you join the IHE?

I decided to join the IHE as their values and specialisms align with my field of work as a highways engineer; allowing me to progress towards professional accreditation. The IHE has given me the opportunity to network with other professionals in a social and professional setting. I have been a member of the IHE for over two years. During this time I have joined the IHE Scottish Branch committee and recently gained a place on the National Council.

Can you describe a typical working day?

My working day can vary from being in the office to building up my step count while out and about on project sites. In the office I undertake aspects of detailed design for highways schemes, attend daily project meetings and collaborate with colleagues to produce solutions, models and drawings. On occasion when I get the opportunity to venture out of the office setting, I can be involved with road safety audits, take part in site walkovers, liaise with specialist consultants and oversee the work of contractors.

What are your future ambitions?

I am currently working towards becoming an Incorporated Engineer and would hope to achieve this in the near future with the end goal of becoming a Chartered Engineer.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?

I endeavour to promote and inspire the younger generation to engage in the industry through my role as a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) ambassador and as a mentor for university students and apprentices.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/or professionally?

In my spare time I can usually be found exploring the outdoors either by foot, bike or kayak – my camera is always in hand to showcase the moment!

Oliver Appleby
Student Member undertaking a year-in-industry

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As a university student undertaking a year-in-industry with Local Transport Projects (LTP), I am working on a range of different projects from access design to modelling. Regular work includes preliminary access designs, swept path analyses and active travel projects. My role at LTP is to gain as much knowledge as I can about the various types of work we do and develop good working practices.

What degree are you enrolled in?

I am enrolled in Civil Engineering at Liverpool John Moores University.

What pointed you to an engineering career?

Engineering has been something that I have always been interested in, from building bridges and tunnels in sandpits when I was young. Additionally, when attending the university open day, the civil engineering course was described as ‘Lego’ which, having always enjoyed repurposing models so they never stay as originally intended, appealed to me.

Can you describe a typical working day?

Typically this involves project briefings/meetings, working on drawings, helping colleagues with technical issues and completing odd jobs.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

Being new to the industry means there is frequent referencing and reading of the many guidance documents, e.g. DMRB, TSRGD and TSM, when commencing new projects. Especially true when
challenging access designs are required to fit with existing road layout and geometry.

What is most enjoyable about your job?

The variety of types of work, especially the projects that make you stop and think.

What made you join the IHE?

I joined the IHE as a Student Member in September 2017 at the start of my university degree. I have now been a member for two and a half years.

Have you considered becoming Professionally Registered?

I am in the process of becoming Professionally Registered at EngTech level.

Is there any advice you would pass on to anyone considering Professional Registration?

Do it – the hardest part is getting started.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five year’s time?

I will have finished my degree and be working towards becoming chartered as well as learning the ropes to become a Road Safety Auditor.

Do you participate in any other career related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?

I volunteer as Student Council Member on the IHE Council and am part of the North West Branch Committee.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/or professionally?

Outside of work I can frequently be found volunteering at charity events, such as International Scout Jamborees as well as competing in running events.

Stephen Webb
IEng FIHE

IHE President and Associate at WSP

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Stephen, who recently took office as President of the IHE, is an associate at WSP and commission manager for the Somerset County Council Professional Services Contract, where he is responsible for day-to-day management of delivering highway and transportation services to the council and partners.

What inspired you to become an engineer?

My talents at school were focused around art and technical. I therefore began as a draughtsman in the field of wastewater engineering, before the days of AutoCAD, where parallel motions and maintaining pens were the challenges of the day. Later in my career, an opportunity arose to work in the highways sector on local safety scheme delivery within my home county of Somerset. It as here I felt I was making a difference in delivering improvement schemes which directly benefited the community.

Can you describe a typical working day?

Working within this ‘new normal’, my day is often spent with headset in place and various calls and meetings ongoing. This can sometimes be a challenge when my toddler is keen to join! I lead WSP’s Taunton team and head delivery on a number of highway improvement schemes within Somerset. My IHE presidency brings new challenges and I aim to lead the Institute through these testing times.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

My role as IHE President and as commission manager will present unforeseen challenges which will require immediate and effective action. The pandemic requires an ability for us all to adapt, ensuring we continue to succeed in ensuring our industry and communities remain strong and resilient through these exceptional times.

Tell us about a professional achievement

My appointment as President of the Institute is one of my significant achievements within my career and I consider this a great honour. The support and good wishes I’ve received since my presidency was announced has been fantastic and I’m looking forward to leading the IHE for the next two years.

When did you join the IHE?

I joined the IHE in 2007 while also member of the ICE. From this point on I knew that the IHE was my institution of choice.

What contributed to your decision to become professionally registered?

I have been fortunate to work for a number of professional organisations who have proactively promoted registration. This, coupled with outstanding mentors throughout my development, encouraged me to become professionally recognised.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?

The first steps are invariably the hardest to take but once you begin to produce your submission, momentum is a great helper. Professional registration provides many opportunities and I would highly recommend becoming a committee member of your local branch or serving on the National Council.

Craig Roberts
CEng FIHE

Senior Product and Application Technology Manager, Tensar International

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Craig is the senior product and application technology manager at Tensar International Ltd. His primary role is to act as both technical and product lead for Tensar’s uniaxial geogrids, which are used to form reinforced soil retaining walls and slopes for use in many sectors, including highways and rail. His job is to help colleagues and engineers to understand the long-established benefits of using such geogrids, which are proven through research and practice to deliver significant savings in terms of carbon footprint, time and money.

What inspired you to become an engineer?

My answer is similar to most engineers. I always wanted to build, break, and fix things from a very young age. As I got older, I wanted to learn how to design and build things safely, so they didn’t break, and I didn’t have to fix them (as I often had to). As I progressed through school and higher education, I decided I wanted a career in engineering.

Can you describe a typical working day?

That’s difficult but five words probably sum a typical day up enjoyable, rewarding, varied, fast and challenging.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

The biggest challenge I often come across is getting commercial people at contractors to understand how using geosynthetics on highways delivers savings and that it is not just about reading a line item on a bill of quantities – they need to consider other factors. For example, the cost of a geogrid can be more than offset by the reduction in aggregate required, with the added benefits of reducing the programme, the number of delivery vehicles and whole project carbon savings. Unusual? I suppose working on projects in Wolfsberg, Warsaw and Wigan at the same time may seem unusual to some people.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?

I have always enjoyed both learning new things, which happens pretty much on a daily basis, and also training and teaching others about subjects I have some knowledge on.

Why did you join the IHE?

I wanted to be associated with a body that aligned with my career, and even though my current role includes more than highways, it felt like it was the right fit. I joined around 12 years ago at the FIHE level.

Is there a professional achievement that you would like to tell us about?

I have two. I was really proud to become a chartered engineer (it was a career goal) and to become the UK registered ground engineering professional.

In what ways has professional registration benefited your career?

It has allowed me to keep moving forward within Tensar. Registration of employees gives Tensar greater credibility. I am also encouraged to pass on my knowledge and give support to less experienced engineers, which I am more than happy to do.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?

Just do it! You should see it as part of your natural career path, not an extra. It guides you to becoming a better all-round engineer/technician and encourages you to look at your strengths and weaknesses, and where you need to focus on improvements. I would add that it is also important to set yourself further challenges once the process is complete, it can leave you with a strange feeling of ‘what now?’ after the hard work has been done. Given the current economic and environmental climate, what do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry 2020 is becoming a year that will never be forgotten. The UK construction industry is robust enough to bounce back, but there will be bumps and obstacles along the way that we will have to overcome together. It will be even more important in the future for our industry to work together to identify smart ways of working, and also to identify how to use our natural resources in ways that give best value for money and minimise our impact on the environment. In terms of projects, HS2 will not only bring benefits to the rail sector but should also be a boost to the highways industry, because of all the associated infrastructure needed, for the next 10 years. However, a bigger challenge will be to find enough people with the right expertise and experience to do the jobs required. We need to encourage younger people into our industry – they will become those people over time.

Do you participate in any other career related activities?

I am a committee member in the IHE North West branch, which a group of us helped to resurrect in 2018. This involves a number of annual activities, including CPD events, STEM events and similar. I also try and support colleagues through professional registration.

Marshel Weerakone MEng CEng FIHE
Project Manager, Highways England's New Scheme Delivery Framework

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Marshel is the project manager for Highways England’s new Scheme Delivery Framework (SDF), responsible for ensuring the £3.6bn capital delivery framework contract is developed and ready to be rolled out for its November 2021 go-live date.

What inspired you to become an engineer?

Initially I wanted to be a pilot but I lost interest in that and set my ambitions on becoming a civil engineer. I was naturally good with numbers, particularly the application of mechanics and use of equations so that, combined with my desire to see more of the world, seemed like a natural fit.

Can you describe a typical working day?

A typical day for me involves engaging with operational staff across the regions to understand any issues they have with the existing contracts and looking to resolve that through contractual amendments. I spend a lot of time working with colleagues, developing design and construction contracts so they are better aligned with our Asset Delivery model.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

Not only am I delivering the largest ever framework for Operations, but it is also a national framework. The majority of capital works contracts are let across Highways England via its 12 areas so a key challenge is to ensure the first national contract meets all areas’ needs and facilitates a consistent way of working.

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?

The fast-paced nature of the work. Requests for contract and/or operational changes are constant as we’re continuously looking to improve how we deliver work.

What made you join the IHE?

I joined following my move to Highways England. I had built up a wealth of experience as a consultant working in the office and on site for both public and private sector clients. I wanted to take the next step in my career and become professionally qualified.

Tell us about a great professional achievement or high-profile accomplishment

In 2018 I won the ICE North West Emerging Engineer Award. This was for leading in developing and implementing the management of newly identified structures. A large UK water company required expertise in identifying the location of over 150 bridges and developing a risk-based approach to the renewal of the assets. As technical lead, I undertook over 90 operational safety assessments and 100 general bridge inspections.

What contributed to your decision to become professionally registered?

I was fortunate enough to have spent all of my professional career working in teams with professionally qualified colleagues. The support and mentorship they provided was invaluable and played key part in me pursuing professional registration.

In what ways has registration benefited your career?

Becoming a chartered engineer has provided me with the confidence to tackle more complex engineering contract issues. I can see a lot more opportunities available to me if I wish to pursue a change from managing contracts.

How does your employer benefit from your professional registration?

Highways England welcomes chartered engineers as it demonstrates the competency of staff and they are keen to put those staff in more responsible roles.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?

Don’t be put off by the volume of work that is needed for the application process. The reward is worth the effort.

Given the current economic and environmental climate, what do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry?

The biggest challenge for the industry is still the uncertainty that COVID-19 brings. A lot of local authority roads and major routes, as well as Network Rail, may need to determine new processes for forecasting future passenger numbers; this will impact on whether new schemes are really required or not.

Where do you see yourself in your career in five years’ time?

My aim is to be leading on more complex projects. It would be good to be at the coalface again, either developing or constructing schemes on site.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities, such as mentoring, volunteering or membership of other engineering groups?

I’m currently chair of the Joint Institutions Group, having held the position for nearly three years. The role is really exciting as it involves working with the main engineering institutions in the North West. We arrange engineering workshops for students interested in pursuing a career in engineering. Last year we had over 400 students from over 40 schools attend.

Outside work, is there any activity you enjoy doing in your spare time personally and/ or professionally?

I’m a keen scuba diver and traveller so plan a couple of trips throughout the year.

Katharine Kelly
CEng FIHE

Infrastructure Development Manager, Arcadis (UK) Limited

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Katharine Kelly, CEng FIHE is an Infrastructure Development Manager for Arcadis, based in their Glasgow office. She works as part of Triskelion, on the Scape Scotland Infrastructure Consultancy Framework, where she collaborates with public sector clients and organisations on projects aiming to make a difference to communities.

What inspired you to become an engineer?

At school I enjoyed maths and sciences but didn’t have a clue what I wanted to do for a career. I was advised to study Civil Engineering as it was a good broad degree, which would give me lots of opportunities and options for careers once I graduated, which has definitely turned out to be the case.

Can you describe a typical working day?

A typical working day starts with dropping my two daughters off at primary school, before jumping on the bus into town. I’m lucky to have a really easy commute to the office and I tend to arrive just after 9am. I’m currently working with a design team in Calcutta so mornings will be spent on Skype meetings going over design issues and getting project updates. Then after lunch I’ll probably try and focus on report writing or answering emails. This week I am having goal setting meetings with my team so will sit down for one-to-ones between 4.30pm and 6pm.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

I’m the resourcing manager for around 70 members of the highways team and this role brings me the most challenges; keeping everyone busy (but not overloaded) while providing a variety of design work for graduates and those working towards professional review. Ensuring that people get the chance to do some on-the-job training can be really tricky, but very rewarding.

Tell us about a professional achievement

My claim to fame is that I designed the signs for Glasgow’s Commonwealth Games – around 800 bright pink signs that directed athletes, officials and dignitaries between venues. I even managed to keep hold of one afterwards – it’s currently hanging in my kitchen.

Why did you join the IHE?

It was the IHE’s approach to getting chartered, which appealed to me, as did the opportunity to specialise in different highway design elements (traffic signs, in my case). I joined as a member in 2017 and immediately set about preparing my portfolio for professional review, for which I received lots of help and encouragement from the local branch.

What contributed to your decision to become professionally registered?

I was carrying out a performance review for an apprentice and he started asking me about which professional body he should join and what would be his best route to getting qualifications. It was a bit of a lightning bolt moment for me; people had been nagging me to get chartered for years but it wasn’t until I was trying to help someone else on that journey that I realised it would be a huge advantage to be able to speak from experience. I signed up to the IHE that night and went along to a branch event a couple of weeks later.

In what ways has registration benefited your career?

I was promoted, given a pay rise and made a team leader. Being chartered has allowed me to work in more senior roles for clients who can demand professionally qualified employees. Becoming a team leader was a huge deal for me as I’ve always enjoyed helping others in their careers, and watching others grow in their roles is really rewarding.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?

Just bite the bullet and go for it. You have nothing to lose and so much to gain. Find yourself a mentor who can coach you through the process and prepare to spend a couple of months working late to gather evidence for your portfolio. If you don’t know where to start, pick the easy things like gathering CPD logs and updating your CV.

Given the current economic and environmental climate, what do you consider the biggest challenges facing the highways and transportation industry

I think we need to be looking at more innovative ways of working with our existing infrastructure to allow it to operate more flexibly and efficiently. We may not be able to build as many new roads as we have in the past, but the skills of highways and transportation professionals will be even more in demand to enhance the operation of our current networks, making them safer and increasing integration between different travel modes.

Richard Harman
IEng FIHE

Engineering Services Lead, Berrys

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Richard is the engineering services lead for Berrys – a land, property and planning consultancy. His work involves supporting the delivery of developments, both through the planning process and for the back-end design of new highway and drainage infrastructure.

What inspired you to become an engineer?

My father is a mechanical engineer and during my childhood I always took interest in his job designing and building car production lines; I always remember thinking how cool it was that my dad worked with robots. I originally wanted to go into automotive or motorsport engineering, but it was my father who encouraged me to pursue a career in civil engineering due to the stability of the industry. Seventeen years on I still have no regrets and am thankful for his good advice.

Can you describe a typical working day?

The day will normally start off with dealing with a few emails and updating clients on project progress, as well as talking through the workload priorities with the team. I’ll then focus on my own project work, which could be anything from writing a transport statement, designing a new access road, through to carrying out flood risk assessments and designing SuDS and foul drainage schemes. Our workload is very varied, so we have to be adaptable.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

Given we’re a smaller consultancy, we have to carry out many roles. As the service lead I am responsible for managing the team finances and invoicing, writing project scopes, meeting potential clients as well as looking after our existing clients, managing compliance and welfare and finding the time to actually deliver projects.

Tell us about a professional achievement

I previously worked at WSP on the Shropshire Council term contract and during that time I was the design lead for a large package of public realm enhancement schemes in Shrewsbury town centre, including the main pedestrianised shopping street, Pride Hill. We’d completed the design of the package prior to my move to Berrys and the schemes are still being built today. It’s satisfying to see my previous work coming to fruition in my home town.

Why did you join the IHE?

I’ve spent much of my career working in road safety and traffic engineering, which I feel are very well represented by the IHE. Previously I’d been a member of both the ICE and the CIHT, but I didn’t feel our area of the industry was as well represented by the other organisations. So I joined the IHE in 2008 with a view to working towards Incorporated Engineer status via the individual route, which I eventually completed in 2018.

In what ways has registration benefited your career?

I’ve been able to move from a senior engineer position to where I am now – responsible for starting and growing a new engineering service. My move to Berrys would not have been possible without being registered.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?

It’s easy to get in the mindset that you have a mountain to climb when starting out, but it’s not as much work as you think. I’d urge people to get in touch with their local IHE branch and/or the main IHE team for advice, as there’s a lot of help out there. Once you start work on your submission, it really does start to feel much more straightforward.

What do you like doing in your spare time?

I spend a lot of time out walking with my wife, Hannah, and our dog, Betty. Music plays a big part in my life and I’ve been a DJ since my teenage years. I play a number of venues around Shrewsbury. The biggest draw on my time is probably my involvement in motor racing, as my childhood best friend James and I race together with the Classic Sports Car Club. We both have cars we’ve self-prepared and we do a handful events each year and have even raced at SpaFrancorchamps, which was a huge ‘pinch me’ moment for both of us.

Do you participate in any other careerrelated activities, such as mentoring or volunteering?

I’m presently the chair of the IHE Mercia Branch so I’m actively involved with arranging CPD events and our annual awards evening in the West Midlands. I also mentor a number of people for IEng. I’ve previously been a STEM Ambassador and have worked with quite a few schools around Shropshire to offer careers advice and to inspire our next generation of young engineers, but unfortunately, I struggle to find the time for this at present. I also enjoy speaking at conferences to deliver training to other professionals.

Carl Skelton
CEng FIHE

Group Manager, Highway Maintenance Services, East Riding of Yorkshire Council

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Carl is group manager for highway maintenance services at East Riding of Yorkshire Council. He is responsible for dayto-day highway maintenance of the council’s 3,550km network, including frontline operational staff, area engineering teams and environmental highway enforcement

What inspired you to become an engineer?

Probably my dad, who is a retired mechanic. He certainly influenced me in terms of being technically minded with an interest in finding out how things work, how things can be fixed and how things can be made better. I have also got a keen interest in all things DIY and how things are built from him, which attracted me to the opportunities in civil engineering.

Can you describe a typical working day?

If only! It’s a very varied role. In among the usual emails, meetings and responsibility for around 130 staff, I can be working on maintenance or income budgets, looking at a new maintenance process or piece of plant that could save us money, planning future funding bids, or our response to flooding, all in the same day.

Are there any particular challenges or unusual aspects to your role?

There are many challenges associated with managing the maintenance of a large rural network. Having said that, I face the same challenges as most managers in similar roles across the country. I do often find it fascinating that we are all essentially trying to achieve the same thing across the UK’s 240,000 miles of local highway network, but all within different staffing structures, political
structures, funding and contract arrangements. Essentially we are trying to keep an ageing network safe and serviceable for highways users, with limited resources and increasing use and expectations.

Tell us about some of your career highlights

During recent years I’ve been involved in planning and managing highway operations and traffic aspects of large scale public events, including the UCI World Cycling Championships held in Yorkshire last year, the BBC Radio One Big Weekend in 2017 and the Tour de Yorkshire Cycle Race each year since 2015. Being part of creating successful events for fans and experiencing their enjoyment is really rewarding, as is the huge feeling of relief once a successful event is over.

Why did you join the IHE?

I joined what was called SCET (Society of Civil Engineering Technicans) many, many years ago. Then I joined the IHIE (as it was known) as a student and progressed to member level. I joined the IHE because I felt it represented the highway engineering genre of civil engineering best. I think being part of an organisation sharing relevant information across the sector is important. I’ve been lucky enough to work with a number of professionally registered engineers in the early part of my career who certainly influenced my progress and passed on their knowledge. This recognition in
our relatively specialist area was important to me.

Is there any advice you would pass on to someone considering professional registration?

Try to set a goal date and go for it. We all have other pressures in life but you do need to set aside some time. Also, try to find someone who achieved registration already as they can share their experience and tips as well as check your submission, presentation etc. Guidance is always available from the IHE too.

Do you participate in any other career-related activities?

I’m a council member of the IHE and lead on the professional development portfolio. I chair the Northern Direct Managers Group and also sit on the ADEPT Engineering Board, I’m also involved in a local charity as a trustee. I mentor staff within my organisation looking to gain professional registration and have also begun to review chartered engineer applicants in my field on behalf of the IHE.

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